Clapham Junction is losing its DIY stores!

Author: David Curran

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In the 1980s, Clapham Junction emerged as a profitable spot for DIY traders. Close to the city centre and full of nice-but-tired (and, at the time, just about ‘affordable’) housing, the DIY stores realised there was a huge appetite for property renovations and that they were on to a good thing.  Over the years a big B&Q, as well as two separate branches of Homebase, sprung up along the York Road, as well as a pair of Travis Perkins branches on Battersea Park Road and Lombard Road serving the more serious builders. Over the last three decades  lot of the materials that went in to renovating, upgrading and extending the houses of Clapham Junction (as well as the wider catchment north of the river) came from these big box stores.

But that’s come full circle now, and the DIY stores that did so much to feed the regeneration of the houses of Clapham Junction are themselves getting priced out of the area.

Continue reading

Consultation on Ward boundary changes for Wandsworth

Author: Cyril Richert

Current 20 wards in Wandsworth

The Boundary Commissioners are just about to make decisions about the ward boundaries in Battersea. One thing we know is that all, or almost all, wards will change as a result of their first rather curious recommendation (decision?) to go from having 60 councillors (currently 3 in each of 20 wards in the Borough) to 58. If they were to stick with an equal number of representation for each ward, that would mean 2 councillors in 29 wards.

We have decided to submit a contribution, reinforcing our interest and commitment for the area. Continue reading

Proposal to raise by over 30% a temporary building for events in Battersea Park

Author: Susan Lofthouse

A general view of Battersea Evolution in Battersea Park where the Conservative Black and White Ball is taking place. Acks. Getty images.

Planning application 2019/2488 is proposing the erection of a temporary building in (sic) the British Genius Site up to a Maximum Height of 12.4 metres (current height 9.5 metres) for a period of 4 years ending on 1st October 2023 (to be used for a variety of events in the Park.

Battersea Park is a Grade II listed Park, which, since its creation in the mid 19th Century, has been managed by various organisations such as the LCC (London County Council), the GLC (Greater London Council), and when that closed down, passing to the management of Wandsworth Borough Council. It is very important to understand this, since the Council does not own the Park. Continue reading

What about an automatic planning report generator?

Author: Cyril Richert

Yes, as many of you spotted, yesterday’s publication was of course specific to April fool’s day (the clue was in the date!)

However, independently of Wandsworth Council, we have analysed dozen of planning reports on major schemes and found many similarities used to dismiss objections. Words such as “on balance“, “landmark“, “benefits outweigh harm” seem to have been used, without moderation, to justify any possible scheme. Continue reading

BREAKING NEWS: Wandsworth is using an AUTOMATIC planning report generator to save time and money!

Author: Cyril Richert

Exclusive revelation today by the Clapham Junction Action Group: Wandsworth Council is using an automatic tool to generate planning reports!

The information has been leaked by internal sources: in order to save time and money to reach decisions that have already been made behind closed doors by members of the cabinet, Wandsworth Council has set up an automatic planning report generator to be used by planning officers on some major strategic schemes.

What can we do about Falcon Road’s horrible railway bridge?

Author: David CurranIMG_20181112_104744909 (2)Nobody likes the Falcon Road railway bridge.  Dark, dirty, loud and always mysteriously wet, the prospect of running the gauntlet of drips from the leaky bridge structure (or – worse – from the many resident pigeons) discourages non-residents from venturing up the Falcon Road.  But like it or not, it’s unavoidable lowlight for those of us who live north of the railway. Continue reading